08 Best Drywall Anchors For You

Drywall

Drywall

This post is about drywall anchors.We discovered eight of the most durable and inventive devices that will enable you to put your decorations and even fairly hefty shelves on common drywall without the need for a wooden or metal stud. The E-Z Ancor – Toggle Anchor, which offers simple self-drilling installation and enough stability for moderately heavy loads, is the finest drywall anchor for the majority of applications. The Wing-Its – Master Anchor will hold firm till you pull your wall apart if you require maximum strength, and monkey hooks are excellent for decorating.

How We Selected

Anyone with a screwdriver is undoubtedly aware that drywall isn’t sturdy enough to hold enormous mirrors, flat-screen TVs, or cupboards on its own. Though few of us can add a brace only for aesthetic purposes, many of us need a technique to mount in a precise location without the assistance of a wooden stud.

There are many diverse opinions on drywall anchors, and every handyman has distinct preferences for fasteners. To focus our expectations for the anchors we identified, we looked for suggestions from handyman blogs, forums, and magazines like This Old House.

We were excited to investigate well-reviewed products they didn’t test and to confirm their findings because ProjectFarm’s YouTube channel has an impressive commitment to thoroughly testing goods like these.

We removed simple solutions that weren’t at least rated to the strength of a simple-to-use self-drilling anchor like the Toggler – SnapSkru after building a list of all the top suggested anchors. We also excluded choices like molly bolts since they would have required more work with minimal gain in drywall installation strength.

We chose the alternative with better reviews, a better price, or better availability where there were many sellers offering the same product. (In that priority order.)

We put a cast-zinc anchor that is meant to protect against hitting studs accidently to the test, but because it performed so poorly (holding only half as much weight as pop-open plastic anchors), we decided not to include it in the final list.

Important Features To Consider

Installation type-Self-drilling anchors can save you a lot of time, but if you’re good with a screw gun, you usually won’t bat an eye at pre-drilling holes. Another choice is to use hammer-in anchors, although doing so risks tearing the drywall backing paper and creating a weak spot. If you maintain your hole aligned, using a drill can often be even easier than using a sharp awl and a drywall saw.

Support type– Pop-open anchors are simple to install and hold up better than drywall alone, but you need an anchor that distributes the weight if you want to hold up a shelf. How effectively the anchor distributes tensile load (pushing away from the wall) over a large region of the inside of the drywall sheet determines the anchor’s strength in the majority of situations. When you tighten your screw through the anchor, a brace inside the wall that is part of a two-piece design will clamp down.

Reusable designs– When the screw is removed, some anchors will simply pop out of the wall, but others may need some force or even wire poked inside the screw hole to straighten the flip-out anchor so you can pull it out. Some designs require a deeper hole to be made to remove because they are essentially permanent.

Hole and flange size– Even the strongest anchor in the world won’t be much use if it leaves an unsightly plastic flange protruding past the edge of your shelf bracket. Some anchors also need holes in your wall that are up to 3/4″ wide.

Screw size– If you need to fasten a specific bracket to the wall, make a note of the size of the holes and weigh your possibilities. If you add a fender washer to a small high-strength machine screw, it will still work with a larger bracket hole, but an oversize screw won’t fit through a smaller hole unless you use a drill.

1.E-Z Ancor – Toggle Anchor

Drywall Anchors

It’s difficult to top the E-Z Ancor – 25220 Drywall Toggle Anchor for the simplest installation that still has adequate strength. An electric screwdriver or even a manual screwdriver can be used to install the self-drilling design.

This anchor’s ability to attach itself to a wall is what makes it so clever. The accompanying #8 machine screw is threaded to fit a flip-down toggle bar. The toggle is released as you insert the screw through the anchor’s middle. As you thread the screw in, the toggle pulls tightly up against the interior of the wall.

Pros

  • Pre-drilling is not necessary
  • Excellent load rating
  • Close to the wall seats

Cons

  • Not as simple to position the support arm vertically as with a push-in anchor.
  • If you try to move it, recovering is difficult

2.WingIts – Master Anchor

Drywall Anchors

The WingIts – Master Anchor uses a series of three plastic legs to distribute force evenly across a large area for even more load-bearing capacity. Due to their flexibility, the legs are also able to withstand greater shock than traditional fasteners without slipping.

Drilling into hardwood studs is always necessary if you need to place a grab rail, television, or other piece of gear that really must be secure. These are the anchors we would use for the biggest weight if you can only get one or two screws into a stud and there is no way to add a piece of wood to span the studs you have access to.

Pros

  • Before this anchor pulls out, the drywall will probably come off the wall.
  • For some repair jobs, a large hole is useful.
  • For some brackets, thin #8-32 size screws are simpler to use.

Cons

  • Reaming a large 3/4″ hole is necessary.
  • Making a one-inch hole is necessary to recover anchors.
  • Jointly the most costly

3.Monkey Hook

Drywall Anchors

A drywall anchor is obviously overkill for displaying decor items on a blank wall. However, a small nail isn’t very secure against earthquakes, and if you take a painting or a clock out and put it back in a few times, they start to slip in or wiggle. This issue is solved by the Monkey Hook, which is both considerably more secure and much simpler to install than a nail.

Simply insert the sharpened tip a quarter-inch above the desired location for your hook in the wall to hang a picture. Instead of attempting to pull the “Gorilla Grade” hooks from the 30 piece Home and Office Pack away from the wall, we tested them with weights dangling from them. At 55 pounds, the larger-gauge hook began to penetrate our brand-new test drywall.

Pros

  • No tools are needed.
  • Sufficient for huge ornamental objects
  • The smallest hole feasible for simple repair when moving

Cons

  • Hook alone; shelves cannot be secured
  • It’s fairly pricey for what it is
  • Your contractor buddies could make fun of you for it.

4.Toggler – SnapSkru

Best Drywall Anchors

The Toggler – SnapSkru self-drilling plastic anchors are an excellent balance between cost and strength if you require a less expensive anchor that will just support a decorative shelf.

The fact that these anchors pop open after a screw is inserted makes them better than average for supporting a small shelf even though they lack a fancy flip-out toggle or an excellent load rating. Before the anchor wings gave way and it popped out of the hole, our test load was 55 pounds.

Pros

  • Pierces drywall without drilling a pilot hole
  • More securely holds than some metal anchors
  • A low-cost means of supporting a decorative shelf

Cons

  • Insufficient backing for larger jobs
  • Utilizing a manual screwdriver is challenging
  • Removed screws could damage the anchor hole.

5.Toggler – Snap-Toggle BB

Best Drywall Anchor

The Toggler – Snap-Toggle BB anchor might be the answer if you need the maximum amount of load-bearing strength possible but the one-inch flange on the WingIts anchors is too large. They also use larger 1/4′′ machine screws, which are a widely used size and may be more appropriate for installing what you have.

These anchors were created by Toggler for a single-use installation: Making a hole that is half an inch in diameter allows you to insert the toggle and level it against the wall using long, plastic positioning straps. You cut off the excess length of the straps and zip a little plastic flange into place, just like tightening a zip-tie. When you attach your shelf or television at this point, your anchor is prepared to accept one of the provided 1/4-20 machine screws, which fasten the toggle securely against the wall’s back.

Pros

  • largest weight capacity in a tie
  • Uses standard 1/4-20 threaded bolts.
  • Only a 1/2′′ hole is needed.

Cons

  • Installation is challenging
  • Single use
  • Sometimes the box’s straps will break.

6.Hillman – Sharkie

Best Drywall Anchor

The Hillman – Sharkie is a decent option if you’d rather pre-drill a hole than use a self-drilling anchor but don’t want something as intricate as the WingIts or Snap-Toggle anchors.

This resembles a conventional plastic anchor in the plug design, however unlike the Toggler – SnapSku, it extends and deters pulling out rather nicely. In our test, this anchor held a shelf bracket under load with up to 55 pounds hanging off the end of the bracket just as effectively as the SnapSkru.

Pros

  • Comparable to a regular plastic anchor but more secure
  • For some applications, installing by drilling first is preferable.
  • Accepts big #14 screws up to and including #12.

Cons

  • Requires a 5/16″ hole (drill recommended)
  • Insufficient protection for large objects
  • Greater screws may spin this anchor if removed.

7.Spring Toggle Bolt

Best Drywall Anchor

The plastic plug anchors that are frequently included with wall brackets are probably the most well-known, but spring-toggle anchors like these from Hillman are the second most popular. For attaching lightweight decorative objects like ceiling lights upwards, this device is frequently utilized.

Since they are widely available and reasonably priced, we purchased our anchors from Hillman; however, practically any toggle bolt would serve the same purpose. No more than 25 cents should be charged for each anchor. There are many screw sizes available, but based on our experiments, the strength will be comparable. The anchor we used for testing requires a #8 screw and a half-inch hole; after supporting only 50 pounds of weight on the shelf, it broke through the inner drywall paper and failed.

Pros

  • Inexpensive and simple to locate
  • Dependable operation for modest loads
  • The anchor simply slides away inside the wall, making removal simple.

Cons

  • Other anchors can support a lot greater weight.
  • Installation might be challenging.
  • Installing these requires having your TV mount, bracket, or shelf in place.

8.WallClaw

Best Drywall Anchor

One of the most original ideas we’ve seen is the WallClaw’s hammer-in anchor, and having one would be helpful in situations when you don’t have access to a powered drill or screw gun. However, they fall short of the excellent load bearing promises they made as much as we had hoped.

These anchors are slightly quicker and simpler to install than anchors that require pre-drilling since they pierce the drywall rather than boring through it (preferably with a hard hammer blow). Although self-drilling anchors, such as our top pick, can be installed using just a manual screwdriver, a hammer would spare your wrists if you had to install a dozen anchors without a drill.

Pros

  • Use only a hammer and a screwdriver to install
  • Re-usable

Cons

  • Hammering drywall weakens it
  • If you overtighten the screw, a piece of drywall may come loose.
  • For some jobs, a bright green anchor flange could be too noticeable.